We Remember…


Seventy-eight years ago today, the course of our Nation’s history was forever altered by the surprise attack at Pearl Harbor on Oahu, Hawaii. On National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, we solemnly remember the tragic events of that morning and honor those who perished in defense of our Nation that day and in the ensuing 4 years of war.

Just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, airplanes launched from the Empire of Japan’s aircraft carriers dropped bombs and torpedoes from the sky, attacking our ships moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor and other military assets around Oahu. Following this swift assault, the United States Pacific Fleet and most of the Army and Marine airfields on the island were left decimated. Most tragically, 2,335 American service members and 68 civilians were killed, marking that fateful day as one of the deadliest in our Nation’s history.

Despite the shock of the attack, American service members at Pearl Harbor fought back with extraordinary courage and resilience. Sprinting through a hailstorm of lead, pilots rushed to the few remaining planes and took to the skies to fend off the incoming Japanese attackers. Soldiers on the ground fired nearly 300,000 rounds of ammunition and fearlessly rushed to the aid of their wounded brothers in arms. As a solemn testament to the heroism that abounded that day, 15 American servicemen were awarded the Medal of Honor — 10 of which were awarded posthumously. In one remarkable act of bravery, Doris “Dorie” Miller, a steward aboard the USS West Virginia, manned a machine gun and successfully shot down multiple Japanese aircraft despite not having been trained to use the weapon. For his valor, Miller was awarded the Navy Cross and was the first African-American recognized with this honor.

In the wake of this heinous attack, the United States was left stunned and wounded. Yet the dauntless resolve of the American people remained unwavering and unbreakable. In his address to the Congress the following day, broadcast to the Nation over radio, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt assured us that “[w]ith confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph.” In the days, months, and years that followed, the full might of the American people, industry, and military was brought to bear on our enemies. Across the Atlantic and Pacific, 16 million American servicemen and women fought to victory, making the world safe for freedom and democracy once again. More than 400,000 of these brave men and women never returned home, giving their last full measure of devotion for our Nation.

While nearly eight decades have passed since the last sounds of battle rang out over Pearl Harbor, we will never forget the immeasurable sacrifices these courageous men and women made so that we may live today in peace and prosperity. We continue to be inspired by the proud legacy left by the brave patriots of the Greatest Generation who served in every capacity during World War II, from keeping factories operating on the home front to fighting on the battlefields in Europe, North Africa, and the South Pacific. Their incredible heroism, dedication to duty, and love of country continue to embolden our drive to create a better world and galvanize freedom-loving people everywhere under a common cause. On this day, we resolve forever to keep the memory of the heroes of Pearl Harbor alive as a testament to the tremendous sacrifices they made in defense of freedom and all that we hold dear.

The Congress, by Public Law 103-308, as amended, has designated December 7 of each year as “National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.”

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim December 7, 2019, as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. I encourage all Americans to observe this solemn day of remembrance and to honor our military, past and present, with appropriate ceremonies and activities. I urge all Federal agencies and interested organizations, groups, and individuals to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff in honor of those American patriots who died as a result of their service at Pearl Harbor.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth.

DONALD J. TRUMP

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President Trump Delivers Remarks During New York Veterans Day Parade – Video and Transcript…


Earlier today President Trump and First Lady Melania attended the New York City Veterans Day parade to honor our nations service members. President Donald J. Trump has made it a priority to support American veterans. [Video and Transcript Below]

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[Transcript] – THE PRESIDENT: Well, thank you very much, Stanley. And thank you for your tremendous support of this wonderful parade. Today, we come together as one nation to salute the veterans of the United States Armed Forces — the greatest warriors to ever walk the face of the Earth. Our veterans risked everything for us. Now it is our duty to serve and protect them every single day of our lives.

It is truly an honor to come back to New York City, right here in Madison Square Park, to be the first President ever to attend “America’s Parade.” (Applause.)

To every veteran here with us, to the thousands preparing to march on 5^th Avenue — it’ll be really something — and to the 18 million veterans across our country: The First Lady and I have come to express the everlasting love and loyalty of 327 million Americans.

I want to recognize Department of Veterans Affairs Deputy Secretary James Byrne for joining us. Thank you, James. Thank you, James. (Applause.) Great job. I’m pleased to report that our administration and all of the work that we’ve done — the veteran satisfaction with the VA is at 90 percent. It’s the highest rate ever recorded in the history of this particular program. And that’s awfully good, and we’re very proud of you and the Secretary. Thank you very much. Great job. (Applause.)

Also with us is New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. Thank you very much, Mr. Mayor. Thank you. (Applause.) Along with many other distinguished guests.

Thanks as well to everyone at the United War Veterans Council for putting on this incredible event, including Bill White, Doug McGowan, and a very special acknowledgement to someone who has devoted his life to this parade: Marine Vietnam veteran Vince McGowan. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you.

Thank you, each of you, and all of the supporters whose generosity make this parade possible. Tremendous amounts of work has been done, and tremendous, frankly, amounts of money has been donated. And we appreciate it, and we appreciate Stanley.

We’re very glad to be joined as well by the Honorary Grand Marshal of the Parade, Marine Corps Commandant General David Berger and the Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Troy Black. Thank you very much. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you very much.

Let us also show our profound appreciation to the 2019 grand marshals of the parade who have served in World War Two, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, and Iraq.

This morning, as more than 30,000 patriotic Americans line the streets of Manhattan, we carry on a noble tradition that began one century ago. In 1919, the people of this city filled block after block to welcome home General Pershing and his 25,000 American soldiers after victory in World War One.

Just a few years before, many of those soldiers had boarded ships not far from here at Hoboken Port. More than 4 million Americans fought in the Great War, and more than 116,000 made the ultimate sacrifice.

At the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, in 1918, the Armistice was declared, the war had come to an end, and the Allies achieved a great, great victory.

Every year since, on November 11th, we have shared our nation’s deepest praise and gratitude to every citizen who has worn the uniform of the American Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marines.

We are profoundly moved to have with us veterans of World War Two, including one of the grand marshals, Woody Williams. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you, Woody. Thank you very much, Woody.

To each veteran of the war: The glory of your deeds will only grow greater with time. This city is graced by your presence. This nation is forever in your debt. And we thank you all.

We’re also pleased to be joined by veterans of the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the War on Terror. You are the reason our hearts swell with pride, our foes tremble with fear, and our nation thrives in freedom. Would you please stand so that we can honor your heroic service? Please. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you all.

Each year, this parade highlights one branch of our military. This year, we honor the elite masters of air, land, and sea — the legendary Leathernecks, the feared Devil Dogs, the “first to [DEL: flight :DEL] [fight]”: the United States Marines. Let’s hear it. (Applause.) That’s great.

Yesterday, we celebrated the Marines’ 244th birthday. That’s pretty good. (Applause.) The Few and the Proud are always faithful, and they always win.

I also want to thank the Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation, which provides scholarships to children of our fallen heroes. To every Gold Star Family: We will stand by your side forever.

It is very fitting that the Veterans Day Parade begin right here in New York City. Since the earliest days of our nation, New York has exemplified the American spirit and has been at the heart of our nation’s story of daring and defiance.

On July 2nd, 1776, the British Armada sailed into New York Harbor, numbering more than 400 ships and carrying more than 30,000 men. The British came here to snuff out what they thought was just a minor American Revolution. Didn’t turn out to be that way. But the Redcoats did know — what they did know was they were going to have a problem, but they didn’t know that New York would meet them with the fearsome power of American patriots.

In World War One, New York regiments like “Harlem Hellfighters,” the “Lost Battalion,” and “the Fighting 69th^” were revered all over the globe.

During World War Two, 63 million tons of supplies and more than 3 million service members shipped out of New York Harbor.

On September 11, 2001, the whole world saw the horror and responded to America’s wicked enemies with [DEL: unwaving :DEL] [unwavering] courage, unbreakable spirit and resolve that is deeper than oceans, fiercer than fires, and stronger than steel.

Last week, I was honored to award the Presidential Citizens Medal to an extraordinary American: Rick Rescorla. Rick enlisted in the Army at the recruiting center in Times Square, became a great war hero in Vietnam, and then became head of security at Morgan Stanley in the World Trade Center. On September 11th, he saved 2,700 lives before giving his own. Today, we are immensely grateful to be joined by Rick’s son, Trevor. Thank you, Trevor. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you. To Trevor and every 9/11 family, we pledge to never, ever forget.

The towering spirit of strength that we see in this city lives within the heart of every American warrior. From the snow of Valley Forge to the jungles of Vietnam, from the forests of Belleau Wood to the beaches of Normandy, from the mountains of Afghanistan to the deserts of Iraq, that spirit has helped our fighters defeat tyrants, conquer fascism, vanquish communism, and face down terrorism.

Just a few weeks ago, American Special Forces raided the ISIS compound and brought the world’s number one terrorist leader to justice. Thanks to American warriors, al-Baghdadi is dead — (applause) — his second in charge is dead, we have our eyes on number three, his reign of terror is over, and our enemies are running very, very scared. Thank you. Thank you. (Applause.)

Those who threaten our people don’t stand a chance against the righteous might of the American military.

In a few weeks, we will mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge — our nation’s bloodiest battle of World War Two. More than 47,000 Americans were wounded, and 19,000 gave their last breath for their country.

We are proudly joined today by a veteran of the Battle of the Bulge, a native New Yorker who is 94 years old and still going very, very strong: Corporal Jack Foy. (Applause.) You look good, Jack. You look good.

Jack enlisted in the Army right out of high school. He fought through brutal months of the campaign in northern France. On Christmas Eve, after marching nearly 100 miles in the snow in sub-zero temperatures, he arrived outside the town of Bastogne in Belgium. For two weeks, Jack fought under ceaseless artillery fire and helped push the enemy back from a critical road. At one point, a mine blew up and it destroyed his vehicle, badly hurting many. He was wounded three times, but he kept on fighting.

After the Allied victory at the Battle of the Bulge, Jack fought for the remaining nine months of the war — across the Siegfried line, up the Moselle River, through the Rhineland, and all the way across Germany until he reached the gates of Ohrdruf concentration camp, the first Nazi camp to be liberated. That was number one. That was a big, big event.

As Jack has said about the Battle of the Bulge, “When the chips were down and the situation was desperate, the American soldiers stood up to be counted. For a brief moment in history, these men held our nation’s destiny in their hands. We did not fail.” Thank you very much, Jack. (Applause.) Great.

And, Corporal Foy, we will forever be proud of what you and your fellow soldiers achieved for all of humanity.

Also here with us today is Lauren Mathews, the granddaughter of a Battle of the Bulge veteran who has since passed away. His name was Master Sergeant Roddie Edmonds. Like so many of our veterans, Roddie never talked about the war. Lauren never knew her grandfather’s story until she embarked upon a school project about 10 years ago.

Roddie was in the 422nd regiment, which was overwhelmed when the Nazis launched their surprise assault. He and his men fought for three treacherous days before being taken as prisoners of war.

After they arrived at a prison camp, the German commander sent an order over the loud speaker. The Jewish-American soldiers were all told to step out of line during the roll call the next day. Knowing the terrible fate that would come to his Jewish comrades, Roddie immediately said, “We’re not doing that.” He sent orders to have every American step out of line with their Jewish brothers-in-arms.

The next morning, 1,292 Americans stepped forward. The German commander stormed over to Roddie and said, “They cannot all be Jews.” Roddie stared right back; he said, “We are all Jews here.”

At that point, the German put a gun to Roddie’s head and demanded, “You will order the Jews to step forward immediately or I will shoot you right now through the head.” Roddie responded, “Major, you can shoot me, but you’ll have to kill us all.” That’s something. (Applause.) The German turned red, got very angry, but put down his gun, and walked away.

Master Sergeant Edmonds saved 200 Jewish-Americans — soldiers that day. So proud to be Jewish and so proud of our country. Lauren, thank you for being here today as we remember your grandfather’s unbelievable and exceptional valor. Lauren, please stand up. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

One of the 200 Jewish-American soldiers who was saved that fateful day is Staff Sergeant Lester Tanner. Lester is now 96 years old — (applause) — and he joins us here. Boy, you guys are looking very good. Ninety-six. Lester — you’re really 96, Lester? I don’t believe it. You’re looking good. Thank you very much. Thank you also for your very noble service and for sharing this incredible story with the world. Thank you very much, Lester.

The men and women who have donned our nation’s uniforms are the bravest, toughest, strongest, and most virtuous warriors ever to walk on Earth.

You left your families and fought in faraway lands. You came face-to-face with evil and you did not back down. You returned home from war, and you never forgot your friends who didn’t return, including prisoners of war and those missing in action.

Every day, you think of them and pray for them. But your greatest tribute of all is the way you lived your lives in the years since. You raised your families, you endured the wounds of war, and you endured the pains of that memory. Yet, you keep going, you keep serving, you keep giving, and you keep loving. You volunteer at your local veterans post, and you keep in touch with your battle comrades. You support our Gold Star Families, you take care of our wounded warriors, and you stand alongside of our service members when they return from war.

On Veterans Day, our nation rededicates itself to our most solemn duty. While we can never repay our warriors for their boundless service and sacrifice, we must uphold with supreme vigilance our sacred obligation to “care for those who have borne the battle.”

In just a minute, we will have a moment of silence and we will lay a wreath at the Eternal Light Monument. As we do, with God as our witness, we pledge to always honor our veterans and pay immortal tribute to those who have laid down their lives so that we might be free.

Together, we must safeguard what generations of fearless patriots gave everything to secure. We will protect our liberty, uphold our values, and defend our home. We will ensure that righteous legacy of America’s veterans stands as a testament to this nation from now until the end of time.

To every veteran here today and all across our land: You are America’s greatest living heroes and we will cherish you now, always, and forever.

Thank you. God bless our veterans. And God bless America. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you very much.

END 10:51 A.M. EST

A Green Beret (me) Talking about Vietnam in 1967


The following is a 2 hour podcast recorded between 1000 and 1200 on November 10, 2019 in the studios of WHK 1420 broadcasting from Cleveland Ohio.

Gerry Quinn’s Irish Radio 11-10-19

The first hour is about the Irish civil war and the American civil war, which is very informative and worth listening to. I speak in the 2nd hour about some of my experiences in Vietnam between September 1967 and December 1967 when I was wounded in a fire fight near the Cambodian border in III Corps. After recovering I wrote down what happened to me because my mom and my wife made me do it.  Always listen to your mom and your wife.  I think it may have helped me avoid PTSD for we were not treated well after coming back to the world all the way to the 1990’s. 

In the section on this blog titled My Books and Papers is a copy of the  the book I wrote from the work I did while in the hospital in 1968.  The title is Diary of a Special Forces Trooper in Vietnam 1967.

The Special Operations Dog get’s even with the Washington compost


Special Operations dogs are picked form the best of the breed just like the special ops men and women. This one that chased down “Abu Bakr al Baghdadi” and was wounded is way smarter than anyone that works at the Washington Compost Rag.

Jim Mattis on Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead


Premiered Sep 3, 2019

Recorded on August 21, 2019 Peter Robinson opens the show by asking General Jim Mattis, former secretary of defense, to explain the word “chaos” from the title of his new book, Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead. (“Chaos” is an abbreviation for “Colonel Has Another Outstanding Suggestion.”) Mattis notes that chaos has been a part and parcel of his life growing up, in the marines, and traveling the world. Mattis further talks about how chaos has been introduced by organizations to disrupt order and keep opponents at the top of their game. But on the battlefield, it is better to introduce chaos early, in order to disrupt enemies’ plans and thus create problems for them and, ultimately, dominate them. Robinson asks about what led Mattis to join the marines and why he decided to serve so long. Mattis explains his love for the country and the great people he met in the service. The fellow soldiers kept him going and inspired him to jot down lessons he had learned that could help future generations learn to serve and lead in better ways. Mattis notes that it is the very high quality of the people whom he met in the armed services that kept him in the military for his career. Mattis talks about how soldiers are brave, rambunctious, and selfless, and how he would rather have crummy jobs at times and work with great people than have a great job and not work with the outstanding people Mattis encountered in the military.

 

The Ballad of the Green Berets performed by Letters from Home Singers


 

Published on May 29, 2016

Letters from Home Singers perform Live on AM Raleigh, ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets,’ written by Barry Sadler, and send chills up my spine with this superb performance! We honor our fallen on Memorial Day and Always and we say with all our hearts, ‘Thank You!’

 

Senate Briefed on UFO Rash of Recent Sightings?


Well, the conspiracy takes are red hot that the aliens are coming and just waiting for us to self-destruct with World War III so they can inherit the planet. Believe it or not, three US senators were given a classified briefing about UFOs which have been seen traveling at hypersonic speed by US Navy pilots. It seems the story has hit several sources including Politico.

A spokesperson for Sen. Mark Warner, the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, has confirmed that he was present at the briefing and made a public statement. “If naval pilots are running into unexplained interference in the air, that’s a safety concern Senator Warner believes we need to get to the bottom of.”

Back in the early 1980s, there was a major sighting of a UFO which streaked across the sky from Princeton, New Jersey out past Trenton and off to the shore. New Jersey has actually been one of the hot spots where UFO sightings are far more common.

I actually saw one of these saucers take off when I was late and cut through a field trying to get to a party with a girlfriend in the late ’70s in Princeton. There it was, sitting in a field, and as soon as my lights got close it took off with such blinding light I had to slam on the breaks. There was absolutely no sound – just white light. My girlfriend said we had to call the press. I told her no way, I was a businessman and I could not get involved. The next day, the front pages of the Trenton Times reported thousands of people calling in about a UFO which streaked across the sky.

I found three things very curious. First, I had long been told that out by that field there was a secret base underground which the government had constructed so why would such a vehicle be just sitting in a field near this base? Secondly, the blinding white light and the absence of sound meant the engines had to be magnetic rather than a combustion fuel. The third strange aspect was that it abruptly went straight up, stopped dead, and then made a right horizontal turn at incredible speed. This meant that there had to be some gravitational technology for no occupant could survive such G-forces.

My conclusion was that these were not aliens, but most likely secret technology we created. I had an uncle who was a Navy pilot during the Korean War over the Pacific and said that the pilots would often encounter UFOs back then as they seem to be doing again. Indeed, there were reports carried out in 1947 and 1949, and then there was the major incident of 1952 UFO sighting which was a series of the unidentified flying object reported from July 12 to July 29, 1952, over Washington, D.C. These were perhaps the most publicized sightings that took place. The History Channel covered the story. The radar operator Howard Cocklin did an interview before he died.

There could be the explanation that a secret program exists with technology from the famous Roswell crash, or perhaps it is someone from the future who has figured out how to bring Einstein’s theories of time to practical implication using gravity. It just seems to me if they were aliens, they have come a long way to just observe a primitive race. Is the rash of new sightings involving people from the future here to observe how World War III begins?

Whatever the explanation, it is the fuel of Scfi movies and conspiracies. Of course, if they really are aliens, perhaps they will come to fix the pension crisis and eliminate the corruption in governments.

U.S. Sea and Air Stealth Weapons Dominance Offers Hope for Peace


Published on Jul 12, 2019

The F-35 stealth fighter jet and U.S. nuclear submarines offer battlespace dominance that Bill Whittle says is perhaps the best hope for world peace. Join the men of Right Angle for this encouraging update on stealth weapons at sea and in the air that has Iranian Mullahs sleeping with one eye open. Thank you to the Members at BillWhittle.com for providing the stealth support that keeps this battle station fully operational, producing 48 new shows each month, in addition to the vibrant, engaging Member-written blog. Join us today at https://BillWhittle.com/register/