Kanye West Surprises Kimmel in Brooklyn


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Kanye makes a surprise appearance to promote his new IMAX movie and new album “Jesus is King,” and he talks about the transformation he has made over the past year, embracing Christianity, and he has some advice for New York Lotto Winner Dave Johnson. #KimmelinBrooklyn Bill Murray, Jimmy Kimmel & Guillermo’s Dirty Canoe Ride in Brooklyn https://youtu.be/c6T33GnzwKM

Kanye West: Jesus Is King, Sunday Service, and Being Born Again | Apple Music


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Kanye West meets with Zane Lowe to discuss his highly anticipated ‘Jesus Is King’ album and film coming to IMAX on October 25. Kanye discusses his newfound faith in God, how the public perceived his battle with mental health and the process of creating a new style of music. Take a glimpse into one of the most creative minds in music. More from Kanye West on Apple Music: https://apple.co/KanyeWestYT

Can Kanye Make Christ Cool for Kids? Rapper Drops ‘Jesus is King’ Album


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Visit The Patriot Post: America’s News Digest http://bit.ly/2BRbhMo —– Kanye West — a performer/producer/entrepreneur with nine consecutive platinum albums and 21 Grammy awards — drops a new album called ‘Jesus is King’ and rocks the entertainment world again. Can Kanye make Christ cool for kids, with songs like ‘Closed on Sundays’ that says, “no more living for the culture”? Can Jesus use this man with a reputation for megalomania in a way that brings glory to the son of God who kept silent before his accusers and humbled himself to the point of death on a cross? You can delve into the full archive of Right Angle with Bill Whittle, Scott Ott and Stephen Green at our website: https://BillWhittle.com

The Science of Consciousness: Stuart Hameroff


Stuart Hameroff, co-founder of the Toward a Science of Consciousness conference, follows a brief overview of quantum theory and general relativity with an update of the latest ideas and findings from the science of consciousness. He illustrates Roger Penrose’s suggestion that the collapse of the wave function …

The Hard Problem of Consciousness with StuartHameroff


Stuart Hameroff, MD, is a professor of anesthesiology and psychology at the Banner University Medical Center of the University of Arizona in Tucson. He is also co-founder and director of the Center for Consciousness Studies at the University of Arizona. He is author of Ultimate Computing: Biomolecular Consciousness and Nanotechnology. Since …

 

Stuart Hameroff consciousness


Stuart Hameroff http://www.quantumconsciousness.org/ Filmed during the “Infinite Consciousness Conference” Hosted by Ervin Laszlo, The Laszlo Institute of New paradigm Research http://www.laszloinstitute.com/ Bagni di Lucca, Italy, July 16-18, 2016 produced by The Institute for The Mythology of Humanity http://mythologyofhumanity.com/ https …

 

War in the Contemporary World


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Hoover Institution’s 2013 Spring Retreat. Victor Davis Hanson on War in the Contemporary World.

Douglas Murray @ Lafayette, The Strange Death of Europe, Full Event


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Nov 22, 2017

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Vespasian: “I Think I’m Becoming a God”


QUESTION: Greetings Mr. Armstrong,

Do we know if Vespasian meant his last words as ironic or literally? It seems that a man of his history meant it ironically.

That he was mocking the Roman idea of the emperors that they would become a god after their death.

Thanks,

A

ANSWER: Vespasian was known for his jesting. I think when his mortality was slipping away, he knew he was no god for he lacked such power. The Roman historian Suetonius reported that Vespasian said, “Vae, puto deus fio” which can be translated to “I think I’m becoming a god.”

I would say that his last words were one of question about the afterlife. Roman emperors were often deified upon death. For a senate to clear someone a god seems to lack any power to make such a rule in the afterlife. There were no miracles to be attributed to a person to declare that they are a saint. So one would think he was perhaps mocking the tradition rather than accepting he was becoming a god.

The Romans believed that death was defined as the separation of body and soul. They certainly did believe in an afterlife. They also believed that the deceased person could only find peace when the physical body was buried or cremated in a proper manner and all ceremonies were conducted appropriately. Otherwise, the soul would haunt the family if they disrespected them in this manner.

It was a tradition for the Romans to put a coin under the deceased family member’s tongue so they can pay Charon to cross the river Styx. In this manner, they would journey to the afterlife and not haunt the family.

 

Victor Davis Hanson | Nationalism Good and Bad: Lessons from History


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Victor Davis Hanson spoke on October 2, 2019 during the 175th anniversary celebration. Victor Davis Hanson, the Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History at Hillsdale College, is also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of classics emeritus at California State University, Fresno. Dr. Hanson earned his B.A. at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and his Ph.D. in classics from Stanford University. In 2007, he was awarded the National Humanities Medal, and in 2008, he received the Bradley Prize. He is a columnist for National Review Online and for Tribune Media Services, and has published in several journals and newspapers, including Commentary, the Claremont Review of Books, The New Criterion, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. Dr. Hanson has written or edited numerous books, including Wars of the Ancient Greeks, A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War, and his latest book, The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won. Hillsdale College is an independent institution of higher learning founded in 1844 by men and women “grateful to God for the inestimable blessings” resulting from civil and religious liberty and “believing that the diffusion of learning is essential to the perpetuity of these blessings.” It pursues the stated object of the founders: “to furnish all persons who wish, irrespective of nation, color, or sex, a literary, scientific, [and] theological education” outstanding among American colleges “and to combine with this such moral and social instruction as will best develop the minds and improve the hearts of its pupils.” As a nonsectarian Christian institution, Hillsdale College maintains “by precept and example” the immemorial teachings and practices of the Christian faith. The College also considers itself a trustee of our Western philosophical and theological inheritance tracing to Athens and Jerusalem, a heritage finding its clearest expression in the American experiment of self-government under law. By training the young in the liberal arts, Hillsdale College prepares students to become leaders worthy of that legacy. By encouraging the scholarship of its faculty, it contributes to the preservation of that legacy for future generations. By publicly defending that legacy, it enlists the aid of other friends of free civilization and thus secures the conditions of its own survival and independence.