Ivermectin: The Ongoing Court Sagas


TrialSite New Staff Posted originally on December 17, 20213 Comments

Ivermectin. The Ongoing Court Sagas

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In what seems to be a daily occurrence, ivermectin is being administered to a COVID-19 patient after yet another legal battle. TrialSite News reported on Fauquier Hospital in Warrenton, Virginia, being held in contempt of court for the facility’s refusal to administer ivermectin to one of its patients, Kathleen Davies, as she struggled for survival with a severe case of COVID-19. Davies had been on a ventilator since November 3rd even after her doctor had prescribed ivermectin as a treatment. The hospital refused to administer the drug, claiming there wasn’t any “medical, legal or pragmatic basis” for doing so. Her adult children had to lawyer up.

Ralph Lorigo, the Buffalo, NY-based attorney who’s been profiled by TrialSite News, stepped in to help the Davies family. Lorigo and Christopher Davies, Kathleen’s son, filed suit against Fauquier Hospital. According to The Washington Post, Fauquier County Circuit Court Judge James P. Fischer ruled against the hospital and allowed ivermectin to be administered to Mrs. Davies. The judge didn’t rule on the efficacy of ivermectin but cited the “Right to Try” laws that allow terminally ill patients to use “unproven cures” when all other options are exhausted. 

This all happened after the court issued a contempt order against Fauquier Hospital, threatening the facility with fines of $10,000 to $50,000 per day. Ivermectin is, apparently, a “flashpoint” for the court system in the United States. TrialSite News has reported on several successful lawsuits against hospitals for the administration of the controversial drug. In some of these cases, ivermectin has saved lives.

But there still is hospital resistance to the use of ivermectin. In Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, Judge Richard M. Hughes III has denied an emergency injunction to force PA-based Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center to use ivermectin on a covid patient. According to The Morning Call of Lehigh Valley, Pa., Karen Ostopick has been on a ventilator since November 24th. The attending physicians have offered “no answers of their own” and refuse to administer ivermectin. Once again, this case has fallen under the purview of Ralph Lorigo who filed the petition to get the hospital to administer the drug. The patient’s daughter Katelyn Ostopick is a health care proxy for her mother. Katelyn secured a prescription from a licensed physician for ivermectin and offered to sign a document releasing Geisinger Hospital from any liability. The judge found no compelling evidence that administering ivermectin “will restore the patient to any previous status quo.” No decision on an appeal has been made.Subscribe to the Trialsitenews “Ivermectin” ChannelNo spam – we promise

Apparently, until there is a consensus on ivermectin, lawsuits will continue. Until then, is this a story that will be repeated? What about the patients? If the hospital protocol doesn’t work and the patient’s family signs a release of any liability claims, why on earth wouldn’t the hospital at least work with the patient’s family to try to save the patient’s life?

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