Why Cops Sometimes Shoot “Unarmed” Citizens


Abroad, the military is our country’s sheepdog; here at home, the law enforcement community is. God bless them all

John Eidson image

Re-Posted from the Canada Free Press By  —— Bio and ArchivesSeptember 15, 2020

Why Cops Sometimes Shot Unarmed Citizens

On August 23, a combative black suspect named Jason Blake was shot by a Kenosha, Wisconsin police officer who thought Blake might be reaching into his SUV to retrieve a deadly weapon. In a shameful rush to judgment by a national media that salivates when unarmed black people are shot by white police, the incident was portrayed as an outrage where another unarmed black man was shot just for the hell of it by a rogue white cop in this “systemically racist” nation of ours. Was the shooting of Blake justifiable? The legal system has yet to answer that question. But as shown in the video below, determining the answer is not as easy as you might think.

What cops face every time they put on the uniform

Self-produced by a man obviously familiar with defensive firearms training, the homemade video explains why police officers sometimes shoot suspects who turn out to have been unarmed. This eye-opening presentation refers to the “OODA Loop.” OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act) is an information processing tool used to train law enforcement officers to make faster and better decisions that not only help reduce the number of unwarranted police shootings of unarmed suspects, but also reduce an officer’s chance of getting killed due to a delayed response to a potentially lethal threat.

Because the video is homemade, watching it requires a bit more concentration than if it had been professionally produced. It may be helpful to watch it twice, but understanding its message will forever change your thinking about police shootings of unarmed suspects.

How do Police make shooting decisions?

Policing is one of the most difficult jobs in America. And thanks to race-baiting politics, it is also one of the most thankless. Every day and every night, law enforcement officers have to make life and death decisions in the blink of an eye, decisions that can determine whether their family ever sees them again.

“Random Stop” is an award-winning reenactment of the 1998 execution shooting of a Laurens County, Georgia sheriff’s deputy who hesitated when threatened by a mentally deranged man he’d pulled over for reckless driving. The recreation is based on actual dash cam footage that documented the initial part of the encounter in real time. Since the murder occurred at the rear of the officer’s patrol car and therefore was not recorded on dash cam, a recreation was made to convey the unimaginable terror the rookie officer experienced as he was executed in cold blood after begging in vain for mercy. Click here to view this intensely realistic depiction of the last moments of Deputy Kyle Dinkheller’s life, and then click here to see another chilling example of the kind of danger cops face every time they put on the uniform.

Cops: Our society’s domestic sheepdogs

In the movie “American Sniper,” Bradley Cooper told the story of the sheep, the wolves and the sheepdogs:

There are three types of people in this world: sheep, wolves and sheepdogs. Some people prefer to believe that evil doesn’t exist, and if it ever darkened their doorstep, they wouldn’t know how to protect themselves. These are the sheep. Then you’ve got predators who use violence to prey on the weak. They’re the wolves. And then there are those blessed with the gift of aggression, an overpowering need to protect the flock. These are the rare breed who live to confront the wolf. They are the sheepdogs.

Abroad, the military is our country’s sheepdog; here at home, the law enforcement community is. God bless them all.

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