Stop your vote being stolen: Vote in person not by mail


Voting in person will prevent your vote being possibly stolen by a mail ballot falsely cast in your name and ensure the integrity and reliability of the election results

David Singer image

Re-Posted by The Conservative Tree House By  —— Bio and ArchivesSeptember 26, 2020

Stop your vote being stolen: Vote in person not by mail

As America continues to sink into an abyss of chaos, arson and looting—the last thing it needs are further protests across America or legal actions by teams representing either Republicans or Democrats challenging the election results on November 3, 2020.

The best way to stop these disasters happening is by voting in person—not by mail.

It is therefore disturbing to see the Washington Post giving the following advice to its readers in a panel headed Election 2020: What to know”

Find out the rules in your state. Some states have already started sending out mail ballots; see how to make sure yours countsAbsentee and mail ballots are two terms for the same thing, mostly used interchangeably. Barring a landslide, we may not have a result in the presidential election on Nov. 3.”

This panel is prominently positioned below a Washington Post article dated August 17th headlined: “State officials rush to shore up confidence in Nov. 3 election as voters express new fears about mail voting”.

The article itself contains the following statements:

  • “Absentee voting has become so common that in 34 states and the District, any voter can ask for an absentee ballot, even if the voter is physically able to vote in person on Election Day, a practice called “no-excuse absentee voting.”
  • As the use of absentee voting evolved, election officials began referring to the practice with other terms, such as “advanced ballots,” “mailed ballots,” “vote-by-mail ballots” and “mail ballots,” according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL).
  • Some states prefer to call it “mail-in voting” rather than “absentee voting,” because voters will be mailed a ballot regardless of whether they are in town or “absent” from their polling precinct on Election Day.
  • Why are there so many terms? It’s a result of a decentralized election administration system in the United States, in which each state sets its own rules on how to conduct elections, experts say. And each state’s rules and regulations around absentee voting vary.
The advice is grossly misleading and is popping up all over the internet:

 “Absentee voting”: Requiring the voter to expressly request ballot papers be posted to him—is very different from “mail–in voting” : The unsolicited mail out of ballot papers addressed to individual voters where they may no longer live or maybe deceased—easily capable of being harvested and illegally completed.

Voter fraud can also occur in the case of absentee voting.

Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton’s Testimony before the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties on June 3,  2020 gave these examples:

“In 2019, an Oakland County clerk outside Detroit, Michigan was charged with illegally altering 193 absentee ballots. A Minneapolis, Minnesota man was charged with helping 13 others falsify absentee ballots ahead of the 2018 election. In 2017, a Dallas County, Texas man was convicted after 700 mail-in ballots were witnessed and signed by a fictitious person. And recently in North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District race, a scheme was run to steal 1,200 absentee ballots and fill them out, in a race that was decided by only 900 votes.”

Only 61.4 percent of the voting-age population voted in 2016—similar to 2012.

A 2019 Gallup poll found only 4 in 10 Americans expressed confidence in the honesty of elections in the country—while 6 did not.

Voting in person will prevent your vote being possibly stolen by a mail ballot falsely cast in your name and ensure the integrity and reliability of the election results.

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