Wind Turbine Disposal Issues


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Re-Posted from the Canada Free Press By  —— Bio and ArchivesApril 3, 2020

Wind Turbine Disposal IssuesNo one seemed to consider what to do with the massive amount of wind turbine blades once they reached the end of their lifespan. Thus, the irony of the present day Green Energy Movement is the dumping of thousands of tons of non-recyclable supposedly renewable wind turbine blades in the country’s landfills. 1

Wind turbine blades slated for waste disposal is forecast to quadruple over the next fifteen years

What’s even worse is that the amount of wind turbine blades slated for waste disposal is forecast to quadruple over the next fifteen years as a great deal more blades reach their 15-20 year lifespan. Furthermore, the size and length of the newly installed wind turbine blades are now twice as large as they were 20-30 years ago.

The wind turbine blades are a toxic amalgam of unique composites, fiberglass, epoxy, polyvinyl chloride foam, polyethylene terephthlate foam, balsa wood and polyurethane coatings. So, basically, there is just too much plastic-composite-epoxy material that isn’t worth recycling.  1

More than 720,000 tons of blade material will be disposed of over then next 20 years in the United States—a figure that does not include newer, taller higher-capacity turbines. Disposal of these blades—a byproduct of increasing wind generation—is becoming a growing problem.  2

A typical wind turbine has a foundation, a tower, a nacelle and three blades. The foundation is made from concrete, the tower is made from steel or concrete, the nacelle is made mainly from steel and copper, the blades are the most environmentally problematic at end of life since there are currently no established industrial recycling routes for them. Disposal at the end of life cycle must be considered but has been lacking. 3

Germany now has 29,000 wind towers. The nightmare of scrapping and decontamination has already started, with 250MW decommissioned last yer. Close to 10,000 towers must be decommissioned by 2023. One tactic has been to ship the toxic parts and rubble to African states to deal with the problem. 4

Other wind turbines have a six-figure decommissioning costs

There’s some public record material about decommissioning US wind farms, and it’s not reassuring. In Minnesota, the ten year old Nobles Wind farm has 134 turbines of about 1.5MW and is operated by Xeel Energy. Xeel estimates the cost for scrapping each turbine at up to $530,000 or $71 million total. Each turbine has a tip height of 120 metes. Just to scrap one 40m blade, involves crunching composite material weighing more than 6 tons.

As American Experiment points out, even $71 million doesn’t finance a thorough clean-up. The contracts oblige Xeel to restore the land to a depth of only about one meter, whereas the foundations go down 5 meters. Moreover, underneath the 56 square miles of this Minnesota wind farm is 140 km of cabling and pipes. The documents don’t say if the cables would stay or go. (4)

Other wind turbines have a six-figure decommissioning costs as well. According to utility documents for the Palmer’s Creek wind facility in Chippewa County, Minnesota, it would cost $7,385,822 to decommission the 18 wind turbines operating at that site, a cost of $410,000 per turbine. 5

The waste disposal site located near Casper, Wyoming will soon be filled with over 1,000 decommissioned wind turbine blades and motor housing units. The Wyoming House of Representatives recently agreed to the introduction of a bill that would ban the disposal of wind turbine blades in the state. Wyoming House Bill 217 would make it a misdemeanor to dispose of turbine blades and would impose fines of up to $1,000 for convictions. 2

Nationwide, there are nearly 50,000 wind turbines, with 2,700 being decommissioned, since the energy boom of the 1970s. Bloomberg New Energy Finance is expecting up to 2 gigawatts worth of turbines to be refitted this year and next. Each turbine blade will need between 30 and 44.8 cubic years of landfill space, using a total of 448,000 cubic yards of the 2.6 million yards set aside for construction and demolition material. This nearly 20 percent of total landfill space is enormous, given the amount of construction and demolition material disposed of in the United States. To prevent acres of abandoned and decaying wind farms, Wyoming laws require companies to provide bonds to cover the cost of decommission and disposal of turbines once they are taken out of service or abandoned. 2

Recycling turbine blades is more regulated in countries that have had wind power for decades. The European Union, for example, has waste management rules. Some European companies sell older and less efficient parts to customers in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Veolia, a German global utilities and waste management company, found that decommissioned blades can be crushed and burned along with other components in cement kilns where the blades transform into solid fuel that can be used in the cement industry. One American entrepreneur believes the blades can be recycled by grinding them up to make chocolate chip-sized pellets which can be used for decking materials, pallets, and piping. But, this option does not begin to deal with the massive disposal problem ahead for those countries well into wind generation, which is rapidly including the United States.

With an increasing dependence on wind generated electricity and the ever growing size of the turbines, the issues of waste from wind turbines is significant and evolving. Most state governments did not provide for the disposal of wind turbine blades despite implementing renewable standards that require the generation of electricity from wind or other forms of renewable energy. It appears that many never even thought about the potential side effects of mandating new forms of energy generation such as wind and solar, and are only now learning the consequences of their edicts. Some states have ridiculously high percentage requirements for renewable generation that only exacerbates this problem. 2

In short, disposing of wind turbines is a significant problem, with negative impacts on communities and the environment.

References

  1. “The renewable energy myth: 50,000 tons of non-recyclable wind turbine blades dumped in the landfill,” zonehedge.com, (1/10/20)
  2. “Wind turbine blades will continues to pileup at US landfills,” instituteforenergyresearch.org, (3/6/20)
  3. Pu Liu and Clair Y. Barlow,  “Wind turbine blades in 2050,” Waste Management 62, 229, April 2017
  4. Tony Thomas, “When wind turbines die, the problems are just beginning,” conservativewoman.co.uk, (11/15/19)
  5. Isaac Orr, “It costs $532,000 to decommission a single wind tower,” americanexperiment.org, (12/3/19)

German Treasury Secretary of Hesse Commits Suicide


It is with deep regret that the German Treasury Secretary of the federal state of Hesse, Thomas Schäfer, killed himself on March 28th, 2020. He oversaw Hesse‘s biggest city, Frankfurt, where we would hold our conferences and it remains the European capital for international banks. I know he was deeply concerned that this Coronavirus-Crisis was being used to destroy the economy. Thomas understood what was taking place and also understood he would not be able to deal with the absurd expectations of the general public about financial relief that was being pushed over a crisis that did not appear to warrant such a reaction.

Thomas was one of the good guys. My deepest condolences to his family. I understand his pessimism for what is to come post-Coronavirus. It is extremely difficult to watch something unfold and be unable to do anything to stop the momentum. Suicide becomes the option when it is just easier to leave than it is to stay.

Ice Age & Warfare


QUESTION: Did the sea level rise after the last Ice Age? When did warfare begin?

HS

ANSWER: About 85% if pre-history ancient sites are actually underwater.  Usually, ancient people were close to the sea. As a result, many pre-history sites are still underwater which sunk after the last Ice Age. A great example of that is Atlit Yam which was an ancient submerged Neolithic village off the coast of Atlit, Israel. It has been carbon-dated as to be between 8900 and 8300 years old. Among the features of the 10-acre site is a stone circle.

The Neolithic (“New Stone Age”), was the final division of the Stone Age period, which began about 12,000 years ago and is distinguished by the first developments of farming. The Neolithic first farmers, spread westward from Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) arriving in central Europe 7500 years ago. They tended to be more settled lives than the nomadic fishing and foraging peoples they displaced, but they also were territorial. There is evidence that there was violence with mass gravesso there was clearly warfare even back during the transition to the Neolithic period.

There are over 35,000 megaliths in Europe alone, ranging from Sweden to the Mediterranean sea. Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, which is probably the most famous of this megalithic period. The Neolithic Megalithic era gives way to the Bronze Age. Archaeologists believe Stonehenge was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC.

So yes the sea level rose following the Ice Age and there is evidence that warfare existed even during pre-history.

A Technical Study in the Relationships of Solar Flux, Water, Carbon Dioxide and Global Temperatures, February 2020 Data


From the attached report on climate change for February 2020 Data we have the two charts showing how much the global temperature has actually gone up since we started to measure CO2 in the atmosphere? To show this graphically Chart 8 was constructed by plotting CO2 as a percent increase from when it was first measured in 1958, the Black plot, the scale is on the left and it shows CO2 going up a bit over 30.0% from 1958 to February of 2020. That is a very large change as anyone would have to agree.  Now how about temperature, well when we look at the percentage change in temperature from 1958, using Kelvin (which does measure the change in heat), we find that the changes in global temperature (heat) are almost un-measurable. The scale on the right side had to be expanded 10 times (the range is 40 % on the left and 4% on the right) to be able to see the plot in the same chart in any detail. The red plot, starting in 1958, shows that the thermal energy in the earth’s atmosphere increased by .30%; while CO2 has increased by 30.0% which is 100 times that of the increase in temperature. So is there really a meaningful link between them that would give as a major problem? The numbers tell us no there isn’t.

The next chart is Chart 8a which is the same as Chart 8 except for the scales which are the same for both CO2 and Temperature. As you see the increase in energy, heat, is not visually observably in this chart hence the need for the previous chart 8 to show the minuscule increase in thermal energy shown by NASA in relationship to the change in CO2. Based to these trends, determined by excel not me, in 2028 CO2 will be 428 ppm and temperatures will be 15.0o Celsius and in 2038 CO2 will be 458 ppm and temperatures will be 15.6O Celsius. This is what the data shows no matter what the reasons are, so I have no idea how the IPCC gets to predict that the world will end in ten or even twenty years.

The full 40 page report explains how these charts were developed and why using NASA and NOAA data that are used without change to prove that The New Green Deal is not required and any attempt to complete that plan will be a worldwide disaster.

Click on the link below for the full report that you can download.

BLACKBODY TEMPERATURE 2020-02