President Trump Presents Congressional Medal of Honor to Sgt. Major Thomas Payne, U.S. Army – Video and Transcript…


Earlier today President Trump presented the Congressional Medal of Honor for Sgt. Major Thomas “Paqtrick” Payne, U.S. Army. President Trump called Payne: “one of the bravest men anywhere in the world” for his role in a daring 2015 mission to rescue dozens of hostages who were set to be executed by Islamic State militants in Iraq.

Payne negotiated a barrage of enemy gunfire and repeatedly entered a burning building in a harrowing effort that saved more than 70 hostages. [Video and Transcript Below]

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[Transcript] – THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much, Chaplain Winton. Really, a beautiful job. And thank you for your service.

Please. Thank you.

 

Today, it’s my privilege to present the Congressional Medal of Honor to a warrior who has devoted the last two decades to fighting the forces of terror. Please join me in welcoming today’s extraordinary recipient, Sergeant Major Thomas Patrick Payne. Congratulations. (Applause.) Thank you very much.

We’re grateful to be joined by Pat’s really wonderful wife, Alison. And, Alison, thank you, for being here on this very momentous occasion. This is — this is the big one. You know that. This is the big one.

Also with us is Patrick and Alison’s 6-year-old son, Aaron. Aaron, thank you for being here. He got a very nice little award back there: a beautiful pen. Right? You’re going to save that pen. Thank you, Aaron.

I want you to know that your Dad is one the bravest men anywhere in the world. You know that, right? You knew that before — I think you knew that before we knew it. So, congratulations to both.

With us also is our First Lady — thank you, darling; and Vice President Mike Pence — Mike, thank you very much; along with Secretary of Defense Mark Esper — Mark, thank you; Congressman Richard Hudson — Richard — Richard, thank you very much; Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy — thanks, Ryan; Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley — Mark, thank you very much. It’s amazing the way all these big generals are showing up. This is something, huh? (Laughter.) This is the big one, as I say — always do. It always will be. The Army Chief of Staff James McConville — James, thank you. Thank you very much, James. And Sergeant Major of the Army Michael Grinston — thank you, Mike. Thank you very much.

I also want to recognize the three Medal of Honor recipients that are with us: Matthew Williams, Edward Byers, and Walter Marm. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. (Applause.) Thank you. That’s great. A lot of brave people are with us today.

Pat grew up in a small town in South Carolina. His dad is a police officer. His grandfathers served in World War Two, in Korea, Vietnam. Service to our country really goes through their veins very, very rapidly.

Exactly 19 years ago today — on September 11th, 2001 — news of the attack on our nation’s great, great country — this was just an attack like has never happened to us. But it went through Pat’s high school — and went through his classroom. And Pat was sitting there, listening. His teacher solemnly told the students that their generation had a fight to win. They were going to fight and fight to win. In that moment, Pat was called to action. He knew that his country needed him.

Ten short months later, at the age of 18, Pat was in Army basic training at Fort Benning. Soon, he joined the elite ranks of the legendary Army Rangers. Pat became an exceptional soldier and expert sniper. He saw heavy combat in multiple theatres of battle.

In 2010, during a deployment in Afghanistan, his leg was severely wounded by an enemy grenade. While recovering in South Carolina, Pat met with his wife, Alison. Well, that was probably not a bad wound then, was it? Huh? It was worth — (laughter) — I hope you’re going to say it was worth it. (Laughter.) It was.

Less than two years after being injured, Pat competed against some of America’s toughest warriors and won the prestigious Best Ranger Competition, among the most grueling physical contests anywhere in the country.

In October of 2015, on his 14th deployment, Pat was part of a team assigned to plan and conduct an operation to rescue over 70 Kurdish prisoners being held by ISIS barbarians in Iraq. The team soon received horrifying intelligence that the terrorists were planning to massacre their captives and bury them in freshly dug graves. Pat and his teammates raced into action.

After midnight, on October 22, Pat boarded a helicopter and departed on a mission to free the hostages from two buildings guarded by dozens of ruthless and bloodthirsty ISIS terrorists. He was in command of a team clearing one of the compounds. As soon as the ramp to his helicopter went down, Pat rushed into a blistering hail of gunfire. Pat and his team swiftly overpowered the enemy, secured the building, and freed 38 of the hostages.

Then Pat received word that the rest of the assault team was facing harsh resistance in another complex. Pat turned to one of his fellow soldiers and said, “Let’s get into the fight right now. Let’s get into the fight.” He saw that the other building was on fire and he knew more of the hostages were still trapped inside. He and his team climbed up ladders to the roof and opened up fire on the enemy. Multiple ISIS fighters detonated suicide vests, ripping a portion of the building into pieces.

But Pat and his fellow Rangers fought through the fire, the bullets, and the deadly blasts. Pat navigated to the front door and saw the captives were being held behind a metal door secured by two very heavy padlocks. He grabbed a pair of bolt cutters and ran through smoldering flame and smoke. As bullets impacted all around him, Pat succeeded in cutting one of the locks before scorching, sweltering heat forced him to leave the building for some air.

Pat caught his breath in a few seconds and was back. He ran right back into that raging blaze. He sliced the final lock and released the rest of the hostages as the building began to collapse. He received orders to evacuate, but he refused to do so; he didn’t want to leave anyone behind.

Pat ran back into the burning building that was collapsing two more times. He saved multiple hostages, and he was the last man to leave. He wouldn’t leave. No matter what they said, no matter who ordered him to do it, he wouldn’t do it. He was the last one out. It was one of the largest and most daring rescue missions in American history. Pat and his team rescued 75 captives and killed 20 ISIS terrorists.

Pat, you embody the righteous glory of American valor. We stand in awe of your heroic daring and gallant deeds. You truly went above and beyond the call of duty to earn our nation’s highest military honor.

Pat would be the first to remind us that he was not alone that day. In the battle, one Army Ranger made the ultimate sacrifice: Master Sergeant Josh Wheeler. Josh was something. Right, Pat? Josh was something. You’ve — you’ve said that before.

Today, we’re deeply moved to be joined by Master Sergeant Wheeler’s wife, Ashley Wheeler. Ashley, our hearts break for your loss. A great man. That was a great man.

Ashley — where is Ashley? Ashley, please stand up. Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you, Ashley.

Our nation endures because fearless warriors like Josh are willing to lay down their lives for our freedom. Our children can grow up in peace because Josh had the courage to face down evil. Our debt to him and to you is everlasting. And again, thank you very much, Ashley. We appreciate it very much. We will honor him forever. You know that. Very special group of warriors, men — great men.

Pat has said that as soon as our soldiers’ boots hit the ground, they are ambassadors of the American way of life. Everywhere they go, the men and women of our armed forces instill our friends with hope, our enemies with dread, and our fellow citizens with unyielding American pride.

Over the course of his service, Pat has embarked on an astounding — really, an astounding 17 deployments in defense of our nation. General Milley, that’s a lot, right? Is that a lot?

GENERAL MILLEY: That’s a lot, sir.

THE PRESIDENT: That’s a lot. Okay, I needed that little extra confirmation. That’s a lot.

He now serves as an instructor at the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, training the next generation of American warriors. Today, he joins the immortal company of our most revered American heroes. Pat, you personify the motto “Rangers lead the way,” and you inspire us all.

It is now my privilege to present Sergeant Major Thomas Patrick Payne with the Congressional Medal of Honor. I’d like to ask the military aide to come forward and read the citation.

Thank you very much.

MILITARY AIDE: Attention to orders. The Medal of Honor is awarded to Sergeant First Class Thomas P. Payne, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on October 22, 2015.

His heroism and selfless actions were key to liberating 75 hostages during a contested rescue mission that resulted in 20 enemies killed in action.

Sergeant First Class Payne’s gallantry under fire and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the United States Special Operations Command, and the United States Army. (Applause.)

(The Medal of Honor is presented.) (Applause.)

END 3:34 P.M. EDT

Secretary Wilbur Ross Discusses SpaceX Launch and U.S. Response to Increased Chinese Hostility Toward Hong Kong…


Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross contrasts the importance of the latest U.S. SpaceX launch in an era when China is increasingly expressing communist control over Hong Kong.  Within the interview Secretary Ross outlines the likelihood of an economic response toward Beijing to countermand aggressive geopolitical ambitions.

Shifting high-tech industrial manufacturing away from China, back to the United States, is an important component in the strategic U.S. economic approach.

Memorial Day Closes…


A long-held musical tradition at military funerals, the music of Taps originated from a Civil War bugle call entitled, “Extinguish Lights”. A plaintive call, the sounding of Taps signals the end of the fallen serviceman’s duty and is the final tribute from a grateful nation.

To those who have given the last full measure of devotion, we honor your service, pay tribute to your lives, and thank you for your selfless sacrifice.

The Bugler is Technical Sgt. Jason Covey. The location is Culpeper National Cemetery

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“Today we honor the extra ordinary sacrifice of not only these service members, but also their families–especially our Gold Star families. Each individual loss brings untold grief. Each loss is a hope never realized. Each loss is a dream never reached.”

Every one was a son or a daughter. A husband or a wife. A mother or a father. Each is a gaping hole of grief that can never be adequately filled.”

“For the families of the fallen we are here to remember that for them every day is Memorial Day.”

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff U.S. Army General Mark A. Milley

President Trump and First Lady Melania Memorial Day, Arlington Ceremony – Video and Pictures


President Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Trump, Vice-President Mike Pence and Second Lady Karen Pence, together with Defense Secretary Mark Esper, lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington to honor Memorial Day.

Wearing a white suit coat and white heels First Lady Melania stood at the center steps of the amphitheater steps during the ceremony. Also in the amphitheater was Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao & Treasury Secretary Mnuchin.

We Remember, We Honor, We Celebrate


This is a modified re-post from last year. I love the video and I cannot top it, so I offer it again.

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Today all across this great land we call America, we pause to remember those who have fallen. We give thanks for their final sacrifice, for their love of country, and we say prayers for them, for their families, for the country they serve. We fly flags to honor their service, to observe our own dedication to America.

However, being the ever optimistic Americans we are, we have turned this day formerly known as Decoration Day into a nation wide party, a celebration of patriotism, family, summer’s promise, and just any old other thing we choose it to be, but in some places like our little town Memorial Day is still about the fallen servicemen and women who gave their lives for our country.

Tracking the origins of Memorial Day proves to be a somewhat difficult task. Some attribute it to former African slaves paying tribute to fallen Union soldiers. There is strong evidence that women of the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War. On May 30, 1868, flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. By 1890 all the northern states were observing the day. The South would not observe the same date until after World War I, when it became more than an observance recognizing those fallen in the Civil War.

So, it took another war to unite Americans in remembrance of those fallen heroes.

Stubborn aren’t we? Memorial Day is specifically a day to honor our fallen who died while serving in our Armed Forces. Nevertheless, it reminds me of many trips to the cemetery as a child.

Here in the South, I grew up visiting the cemetery on birthdays, holidays, and whenever my mother felt a need to connect with those gone from her – but never forgotten.

Each visit to the cemetery (my mother never let us call it a graveyard) was a fascinating experience to me as a child, and sometimes we visited, or at least drove by the National Battlefield.

We drove past it everyday on the way to my dad’s business and I always used to watch for the large flag to be at half mast. I knew then that a soldier or sailor had died, or sometimes it signified a national loss like the Apollo 1 tragedy or the loss of a president, as I remember the death of President Kennedy.

There was a protocol to the visit. Always walk around the plots, never step on one. Wander away as my mother knelt in the grass coaxed lovingly into growth in the red Georgia clay. Look first for relatives, those my mother spoke of, and those strange names I was unfamiliar with. Look for the little stone with the lamb on top – the resting place of my mother’s baby sister, Carole. Look for more lambs and little angels – they were dotted around the older section with alarming frequency, something I noticed even as a child. Take note of all the flowers.

It was a fine thing for a family to have many who remembered to honor their dead. I also very vividly remember the little American flags stuck in the ground on days such as Memorial Day and the Fourth of July.

Not too long ago, I found a small cemetery with a mass grave of Confederate soldiers who mostly died of an outbreak, possibly flu, during the war. Those little flags had been put in the ground around the few individual markers. I wondered if they minded that 50 star flag, or if they were grateful to be remembered, honored, prayed over.

It was something I lived with as a child, this presence of the dead. I never thought much about it until recently. Here you literally cannot stray far outside your own yard without encountering some reminder of the war fought on this soil, and those fallen. As a child, many of our parents remembered grandparents who fought in the war. It is alive for us, and so has colored how we honor our dead, those who have fallen in battle, and those who in the words of many a fire and brimstone preacher, “The LORD has called home to be with HIM.” Believe me, no disrespect intended, just an indication of a little local flavor.

And so, I find myself wondering. Is this a southern thing? Is it an American thing? Or is it something common to all of us, this need to return to the place we left our loved ones for the final time on this earth? Is it a regional custom, tied deep in the roots we are so tangled in, or a need born with our souls? I think it must be the latter, with a twist of regional observances that may vary from place to place, but sooth the heart of those who wait here, on this side.

Perhaps, after all is said and done, it meets our needs more than just paying respect to the dead. We wander there, among those peaceful plots, wondering, imagining, where are they? How is it there? When will my time come? Will I be with them again? Then, that most human of all questions. Who will honor me in my time, when I lay beneath the grass coaxed lovingly into growth in the red Georgia clay?

In Ringgold volunteers work for several weeks to place the poles and crosses you saw in the video. You can even get a list of names and locations so that families can locate the cross for their own loved one. We Remember, we honor, we celebrate. I sure hope we always will.

I hope you enjoyed the video of my former hometown. I could not have been more proud to have lived in a place like this little town. I am happy to say that the neighborhood I live in now also places crosses and flags to honor our fallen, not quite as spectacular a display as the town of Ringgold, but volunteers come together to honor those from this community who gave their lives for our freedom, and they have not been forgotten or gone unappreciated.

Internet – Doorway to Cyber Warfare


The new world of cyber warfare is upon us. Today, enemies send out malware through the Internet. They send instructions to external computers, often in email attachments. This is their way to steal passwords, email correspondence and documents, mostly unnoticed; this is how they gain access to the computers of generals and ministers to record conversations; this is how hackers manipulate elections or paralyze government authorities and power stations. These are attacks meant to damage what keeps countries together at their very core: their economy, their internal security, everyday life.

This conflict has intensified steadily over the last decade. Today, it looks as though it might be steering towards escalation. Espionage, sabotage, destabilization are all happening every day. The question is what comes next. How long will it take until someone reprogrammes drones or sabotages a nuclear program?

The future we face has changed. My mother used to tell me, everything in moderation. The internet has expanded the global economy beyond all proportions. We have clients in more than 150 countries out of 195 and attendees to our World Economic Conferences have reached 137 countries among those joining – the largest private events in the forecasting area.

The dark side of the internet is the mere fact that it has opened the doorway to a new type of warfare. Where do we go from here? As we cascade into 2032, the future certainly becomes exposed to an endless array of interesting twists. Like the classic line from the Wizzard of Oz, “Dorothy, you not in Kansas anymore!”

General John F. Kelly – Six seconds and then into eternity.


1.79K subscribers

General Kelly spoke to the Gold Star Families of California in 2014 and told the story of two Marines bravery. He tells of how they stood their Post and did their jobs as Marines, and how they stopped the truck that the homicide bomber was driving before he could detonate the 2,000 pounds of explosives meant for the other Marines and Iraqi police who were sleeping in the barracks, close to where the bomb went off. Jonathan Yale and Jordan Haerter had only six seconds to engage the driver. Not enough time to think of anything but how to stop the driver of the truck that was trying to get past them and destroy the barracks housing their fellow Marines and the Iraqi Police. Please share General Kelly’s speech about these brave men and their faithful duty to our nation, to each other and what the true meaning of what it means to serve and sacrifice. They gave their all and now the rest at peace, least we forget their bravery and that this nation has some of the best that stand in the ranks of our armed forces. They stand on the wall every night keeping their families and their fellow Americans safe from those who would destroy all that we are. Semper Fi

Release of the documentary film, VAXXED II: The People’s Truth. 


Margaret Mead once wrote, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

This week a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens, led by Polly Tommey, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, Del Bigtree, Brian Burrowes, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Dr. Brian Hooker are trying to change the world with the release of their documentary film, VAXXED II: The People’s Truth.  The film, which simply features parents talking about the reactions of their children to vaccines, including autism, paralysis, and death, has so threatened Big Pharma that the theaters showing the film must remain secret until the day before a showing.

This is not just a fight against Big Pharma.  It also involves a fight against Big Tech, as Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are attempting with all of their billions of dollars to censor vaccine safety information across all their platforms, just as they are doing with political content supportive of President Trump.  Big China is also part of this axis of evil as a major portion of the vaccines and pharmaceuticals are being produced in China.  Big Pharma, Big Tech, and Big China are part of an unholy alliance which is harming people all over the world, including Chinese citizens.

Big Pharma brings you your evening news, with estimates of anywhere from 40-60% of advertising revenues coming from Big Pharma.  Just watch an hour of your favorite news broadcast and count the number of Big Pharma commercials.  This includes the new outlets of ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC, as well as Fox News.  Nobody escapes my condemnation.  Not Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, and certainly not Jason Chaffetz, who was EXTENSIVELY briefed on CDC whistle-blower, Dr. William Thompson, the subject of the first documentary, VAXXED: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe.

President Trump also comes in for substantial criticism, as his statements prior to becoming our Commander-in-Chief, were supportive of getting to the bottom of these questions, and claimed he wanted Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. to head a Vaccine Safety Commission, a promise which three years later remains unfulfilled.  Parents want answers, and they want unbiased scientists, not industry shills to do the research.  It truly is a “FIGHT FOR THE FUTURE,” and this small group of thoughtful, committed citizens deserve to have their film shown in the White House theater.  Anything less will probably result in a massive loss of support for a second term for our President.

A  guest post by an autism parent

The US Military’s Most Powerful Gun


Real Engineering

Published on Oct 13, 2017
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U.S. Sea and Air Stealth Weapons Dominance Offers Hope for Peace


Published on Jul 12, 2019

The F-35 stealth fighter jet and U.S. nuclear submarines offer battlespace dominance that Bill Whittle says is perhaps the best hope for world peace. Join the men of Right Angle for this encouraging update on stealth weapons at sea and in the air that has Iranian Mullahs sleeping with one eye open. Thank you to the Members at BillWhittle.com for providing the stealth support that keeps this battle station fully operational, producing 48 new shows each month, in addition to the vibrant, engaging Member-written blog. Join us today at https://BillWhittle.com/register/